Trains, Tuna and “Two-Tots” in Tokyo

Traveling with children adds many new variables to any journey. Of course there are challenges, but there are also lots of rewards.  Some of my favorite times are when the kids become very excited about the journey.

Aidan has loved the thought of traveling to Japan for months.  He adores sushi and trains.  Japan happens to be famous for both and that is enough for him to consider it the “promised land”!  Andy and I were actually anxious about having the country live up to his high expectations.   Where to begin the adventure?  We chose to head to the place where most sushi starts-the Tsukiji Central Fish Market.

If it lives in the sea it is probably for sale here.

Scallops

Shrimp

Sea Cucumbers

Tuna

They actually don’t just sell tuna sell a multitude of cuts and grades.

The main warehouse market is lively and chaotic.  About 2000 tons of fish and seafood, worth US$18.5 million is sold here daily which amounts to US $5 Billion annually.  There are vehicles buzzing about moving heavy tanks so it is potentially a dangerous place.  Young children in strollers are not allowed so Sydney and I waited outside while Andy and Aidan took a quick look.   Fortunately there is plenty to see in the area surrounding the busier main market.

Baskets of small dried shrimp and krill

Wasabi

We even saw a small parade with beautifully dress women in kimonos…

And the most adorable fisherwoman ever.  She made a nice catch.

All of the touring made us hungry.  We of course had to sample the wares.

After the market tour, we took a train to nearby Ginza.  The subway was exciting in and of itself but when we exited the Sony building there was a surprise which could not have been more perfect for a train-obsessed preschooler.

A whole area of Thomas trains!  We honestly had no idea this was here and there was no better ending for a first morning in Tokyo for Aidan.

He literally jumped up and down and shouted “I Love Japan!”  Yes these are the times that make traveling with children truly special.

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